Walking through fields with cows: how to stay safe - Invaluable walking hints, tips and advice for UK walkers, hikers and ramblers

July 2009

How to stay safe when walking and hiking through fields of cows

Unfortunately, the hazards or otherwise that can be encountered when walking though fields where there are cows has been in the news again recently (June 2009). One of the incidents reported has tragically resulted in the death of a walker, Liz Crowsley on the Pennine Way.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) figures released recently showed that 18 people have been killed and 481 injured by cows in the past eight years.

Since the Countryside and Rights of Way Act (CRoW) was passed in 2000, the HSE has urged farmers and land-owners to consider the level and type of public access on their land and to take this into account when planning where cattle should be kept and the precautions that should be in place. A spokesman for the NFU commenting on the recent fatality said:

" ..... millions of people walk through fields every year and attacks on members of the public by cattle are extremely rare.

Our advice to walkers is if you have a dog with you, keep it under close control, but do not hang on to it should a cow or bull start acting aggressively.

If you feel threatened, just carry on as normal, do not run, move to the edge of the field and if possible find another way round the field, returning to the original path as soon as is possible. And remember to close the gate."

It seems that the biggest risks are:

So - if you are with a dog, avoid going through a field with cows at all. Although it may be inconvenient, it's probably better to consider finding another route. Be especially vigilant if you find yourself with your dog in a field with both cows and calves.

Even without a dog, try to keep quiet and move away calmly and out of the field as soon as possible. Try not to surprise the cows - remember that their line of vision is to the side and not straight in front.

If cows get too close, turning quietly to face them with arms outstretched is considered to be the best approach.

If you are involved in an incident or are hurt you should contact the HSE, the local Rights-of-Way officer and the police if the incident is serious.

Whilst the countryside certainly isn't a playground, a few simple precautions should mean that we can all continue to enjoy it and farmers and land-owners can get on with their work too.

For more information on walking near cattle (and bulls):

Excuse me, but you're crowding me - A Readers' Tale

Excuse me, but who's your mate? - A Readers' Tale

Walking Hiking and Rambling with Dogs - Dogs Off Leads and Walking

BBC - Why do cows attack?


new “I am used to walking past cows on Beverley Westwood but when doing the Minster Way this weekend I was walking from Stamford Bridge to Kexby along the River Derwent. It is a long stretch of fields and a number of times a herd of Bullocks came running up to me, I tured to face them and they scattered but then followed me sneaking up behind me and I had to shout and touch one with my walking pole, it was very scary and the field was long. I didn't come to any harm in the end but would be worried about having to do the route again.”

Sheila Button, Beverley


new “Just to agree with most of the comments so far. My wife and I walk every Wednesday and this year we have had cows run at us on several occasions. I am always very wary and seek a way out before entering the field if possible. generally now I find a way round them, even if this means climbing over barbed wire fences or walls before regaining the track. Better safe than sorry”

Dave Hedley, Chesterfeild


“As a cow-keeper, the best advice I have seen to date was from a farmer on the BBC News website: Cows are curious animals, with or without calves, always take a walking stick with you, be confident, talk firmly to them and if they get too near stretch your arms and walking stick outwards to fill the maximum area (cows join up all the external points and so you suddenly become massive in their eyes).”

Sally-ann Jay, Greenham


“Try American range cattle. They will charge the cow ponies when the ranch hands ride up. Growing up in the western US I learned to treat all livestock with caution. Aggressive horses can usually be run off by waving a jacket and yelling at them - but depending on your local law, you could be responsible for any injuries. I wonder if the animals approaching is a result of more hobby farmers who make pets of them? People forget that a cow can seriously injure you in play or affection as well as in a deliberate attack.”

Nadja Adolf, Newark, Ca And Wellington, Nv


“Yesterday, we received a bit of attitude from a dozen young cows in a nearby field. I was walking along the public footpath and they came racing up. I have never had trouble with cows in fields before, and waved and shouted at them to back off, which they did, but I think it annoyed them. I certainly wasn't going to turn and run as I had to protect my own offspring (grown up daughter). Gradually, we all calmed down and I walked out. I went back this morning to check on them and sure enough, they were young bulls [bullocks]. I've heard that milk production is in decline in Britain which means any "cows" you meet are more likely for meat production and more likely bulls [bullocks]. Look carefully before shouting at them.”

Jim Oswald, Lutterworth


“Hi - I avoid all cows now, if I come across fields with cows in I will always find a way round them, and then return to the path. This is because I have had a number of occasions when whole herds have just charged at me - and can't they run, and have had to do some quick exits and high jumps over fences and walls. I don't have a dog, and usually walk alone. I treat them with great caution and respect, and go round them. I have spoken to a number of cattle farmers about this, and they find the cows behavour odd and can not explain it.”

Steve Heslop, Manchester


“I agree with Tim in the last section. I have walked the hills of northern England for 40+ years but only this year have I encountered cows with attitude. Following a footpath in Weardale, through a field of 20 - 30 cows (I didn't hang around to count them thinking back) distributed pretty widely across the field, I found myself the sudden focus of a few and then all of them. It all happened rather quickly but they effectively ran at me from all available sides. Fortunately the path followed the edge of the field bounded by stone wall which probably 5 feet high. I didn't wait for the nearest cows to reach me but effectively walked up the slope of the wall and jumped off the top to the surprise of the sheep in the adjacent field. Amazing what adrenaline can do. The scariest part was the way they then marauded up and down the field as a herd for the next 10 minutes mooing loudly and looking like a scene from a 1960's cowboy TV series. I decided not to insist on my right of way and made my way around the said field. I didn't have a dog with me, there were probably bullocks in amongst the herd, I don't remember seeing calves.”

David Dove, Stanhope


“My husband and I have been doing walks in the countryside for the last ten years and have never had any problems with cows, but this year we have had two bad experiences one was in a field with some youngest cows who were some distance from us and we just walked to the right of them when one started bouncing towards us for no reason so we moved away then they all followed and penned us in against the fence when we had to climb over barbed wire to get out. The second incident happened this week in Finchdean when being wary of our previous experience we walked along the edge of the field as the cows were all near the stile we had to get over and one of them looked over at us and then they all about 15 or so quite large cows came charging over to us we ran back from where we came and were able to get over a bit of fence that was near the ground. I don't think we will be going in any fields with cows as we were not annoying them at all.”

Yvonne Walder, Southampton


“Don't go to Crichton Castle, a mediaeval relic in countryside south of Edinburgh [if you really do not like walking through fields of cows]. It is in the middle of a field that routinely has cows in it. You can't park any closer than the gate into the field, where there is even a sign telling you to close the gate because of the cows. There are 600 yards of walking track through the field to the castle. It even spirals round the castle before reaching any entrance and the cows graze right up around it. Yet this is a paid for staffed attraction run by Historic Scotland. It's publicity says nothing about the cows at all.”

Joseph Bloggs, Lothian


“My love of rambling through the countryside with fellow walkers might finish soon due to my increased fear of meeting up with our bovine friends. i recently had to depart from our group when a group of young bulls came up to the stile and crowded the area we were to pass through. If anyone writes a guide book of 'cow-free' walks I would be delighted.”

Dorothy Clarke, Parbold


“I must admit I am a little aprehensive when walking through fields with cows in. For instance we walked the East Highland Way this year and the path was blocked by 2 massive Highland Cows with the massive horns, they are really big animals and there was not way we were going to disturb them even though they were in our way. We decided to give them as wide a berth as we could which did mean walkin on unsuitable ground and crossing some ditches, but my theory was in view of their size that they could have the path !! I must admit I was very glad to get out of the field. I do take a lot more care now since hearing of a couple of deaths a couple of years ago.”


“Hi I am interested in this discussion as I have noticed a change in the cows behaviour this year. I was born on a farm and spent most of my early life playing in fields with cows around. I have been walking through fields of cows for many years, but this year for the first time ever felt threatened by the cows, I have no dog and have always been very confident in a field of cows ( Not when in a field of horses I might say). Anyway around April time i was in a fiield of Heffers and one was particularly interested in me, we walked along togethar and I chatted to her and hoped she would get bored and wander off ( Normally the case when I engage young ladies in conversation!) but she was not going anywhere and got between me and the exit to the field. If I moved right she moved right if I moved left she moved left. She started mooing and looked really miffed. Anyway I eventually got out. (10 mins). For the next couple of weeks I found that every field I went in the cows would run/stampede towards me so had several quick exits and different routes. Then this behaviour stopped about May and no problems since, could this have been the dry hot weather impact ? None of the fields had calfs, and the reaction from the cows was more than just interest. Wondered if anyone else noticed this year was different.”

Tim Kemp, Grimston


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